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Ever wondered what small adaptations to your online courses and training delivery can bring you a higher training Return on Investment (ROI)?

 

In this article, we will share with you how you can use online courses and LMS to supercharge your training ROI.
How to make the most (impact) with the least possible financial resources?
If you are working in HR, learning and people development this is a question you have surely asked before. We all have. We all want the investments we make to be worthwhile for our company, and with many priorities in the organisational agenda we have to make wise choices.

 

What is ROI?

ROI is the return on investment that a company or organisation makes. It is determined by taking into consideration the costs incurred (investment made) and Return (the benefits/ value) accumulated.

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Any kind of learning initiative, either face-to-face or online, should be able to demonstrate gains that are more than the investment. And an increasing amount of the workforce is more and more keen on learning.

Learning has been mentioned as a key reason for people wanting to join and to stay longer in companies. It constitutes a core retention factor, with 94% of employees stating in a LinkedIn’s 2019 Workforce Learning Report they would stay longer if the company invested in their development.

Ensuring training generates a reasonable Return on the Investment (training ROI) enables you to show how training and online courses has resulted in benefits to your employees and your company.


Read more on How to calculate training ROI.

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Therefore, you need to capitalise on the training you offer your staff while keeping your budget in check, and to diversify your offer by offering online courses to respond to the needs of your staff.

 

 

 

5 Ways to Supercharge your online training ROI

There are 2 important aspects to consider if you want to supercharge your training ROI: the quality of the online courses you offer, and the delivery of your courses (how you offer them). One without the other will always keep you at a loss.

If you have an excellent Learning management system (LMS) but your content and online courses are not appealing or engaging to staff you will likely have low completion rates and lack of applicability. If you already have highly engaging and effective online courses and eLearning content but your LMS or training management system is outdated or not adapted to your needs anymore your learners will probably run from it. In this case you (and your staff) will likely experience frustration with the system and learning metrics that are a step too far from what you need.

 

The following 5 tips can boost your training ROI by focusing on online learning quality and quality of delivery:

  1. Think about problems and solutions

Identify what kind of problems and opportunities your business has and how training can help you address them. These need to be high-impact points for your company, meaning these have a clear impact on the business. Once you have this you can create your content on this topic, and start thinking about the learning experience for your staff members.



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Choosing the right factors to measure, both before and after training, enables you to show how training has resulted in benefits to your employees and your company.



Let’s use an example with Onboarding:

You are increasing your workforce and the nature of your company’s work requires highly qualified staff. You have noticed new staff members are already highly qualified when recruited yet take a long time to understand your company culture, ways of functioning and working processes. This leads to errors and it takes time for newcomers to ramp up towards full proficiency in tasks. In overall it all results in lost productivity (also financially).

 

In this case we could summarise the problem, the solution and the metrics to monitor as:

→ Problem: unprepared staff take longer to perform
→ Solution: Onboarding online programme to support new staff members acquire skills and workplace processes quicker
→ Metrics and indicators to monitor: Time-to-performance | Productivity loss | Task-performance level   | Impact and number of errors |Cost of onboarding programme

 

 

  1. Use collaborative learning

Start using a platform which hones collaboration in learning. The 70-20-10 model highlights that nearly 20% of our learning happens from working in collaboration with others (through interactions, feedback, observation and working directly with our co-workers). The 70-20-10 rule emerged from CCL’s Lessons of Experience research and is still nowadays one of the most used models.
Providing a platform where social learning is core will facilitate learning and increase applicability to the workplace. This means including collaborative learning activities as part of your curriculum.
What we have noticed with clients using our LMS is that they created an average of 22% more collaborative and practice activities because the learning management platform is designed to consider and include them as key in online learning.
To harvest the potential of social learning consider creating learning groups according to each topic or online course, give your staff task, to work collectively on an assignment, allow people to share info and resources, and let people join and contribute to whatever group they want.


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Taking on the onboarding example mentioned above, you could give new staff members access to your company’s community so they can ask questions, read information, and increase their knowledge with real interactions with colleagues.


  1. Reduce online learning courses production time

We all know it takes time to create an online course. If you are working on a course that is critical for your company you want to have it set and ready to launch as soon as possible right? Get it too late and it might no longer be needed.
To create learning content faster you can work on two fronts: use rapid-development eLearning techniques to create online learning courses faster; and use a training management platform that speeds content creation.
Many learning management systems are designed to be agile so that once you have your content – you can create your online course in minutes. And the design can be so intuitive you can do it without any previous eLearning or online course development experience.

 

  1. Design for applicability

In the end what will give you a higher ROI is when people can apply what they have learned back to their work. Therefore, you need to design for applicability, by creating engaging and user-friendly practice activities and resources people can use on the go (such as learning aids, checklists, Tips and tricks, how-to quick guides).
A quality Learning Management system allows you to include all types of resources, and to diversify learning activities so they are anchored in practice. You can also collect rapidly metrics to assess reactions and the learning of your staff. Include assignments and case-studies and you can observe changes in decision-making and behaviour for participants. And remember, the more your staff practices, the better their changes of hitting the target.


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  1. Ally efficiency with cost reduction on online delivery

Last but not least, to maximise ROI we need to think efficiency: bringing just-in-time learning to the employees at point of need, ensuring its applicable and has a high impact (question of design). But being efficient also means choosing the best delivery method within the best budget. Online platforms are usually expensive; hence not always accessible to smaller companies.
Nevertheless there are now options for smaller-sized companies with online learning platforms costs such as Advance LMS costing as little as a cup of coffee (2€ month per employee). Money is no longer an obstacle for companies to take their training online.
We hope you enjoyed this article on easy to apply ideas to supercharge your training ROI.  Now we want to hear from you: which technique from this article are you most excited to try?

Let us know by leaving a quick comment.

 


Because we believe in making learning accessible, we have created Advance. Advance is a Learning Management System with a twist: a scalable and robust platform, yet fully customisable and anchored in social learning.
Advance is the training management platform for online learning  you have been waiting for. It is a complete and integrated online learning delivery solution, suitable for companies, training centres, non-profits, universities and schools.  Because pricing is competitive even companies with a very small budget can benefit from it!

 

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If you would like to see how Advance can take your company into the future of learning, get in contact.




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Learning technology

From HR Inspiration London

HR Inspiration was 2 weeks ago in London and we had such a nice experience and exchanges with fellow participants that we wanted to share it with you. The quality of the interactions made it a really worthwhile experience and we are very appreciative to all those who participated in contributed into such an enriching discussion.

Here are some ideas and insights from HR Inspiration London:

Fit for the future: key skills your workforce needs

With many processes being automated and the progressing digitalisation of HR, soft skills are the core skills your workforce will need to stay fit for the future. Soft skills become the differentiating factor.

89% of HR professionals, including recruiters, say it is difficult to find people with optimal soft skills. And futurologist Jacob Morga n mentions a transition between hard to soft skills.

With the increase in technology use, such as phones, tablets and computers, many people struggle to acquire basic communication skills that are necessary to work with others and to be successful in their work. In comparison to other generations, younger generations have been more used to technology and although this brings as an advantage that they are much more tech-savvy, they have been less exposed to social interactions.

Millennials find learning an increasingly important component to their work, especially when compared with non-millennials. And it’s important to notice that Millennials will make up 75% of the workforce by 2025 (Deloitte).

The most important key skills your workforce should have, according to reports ( LinkedIn Report and futurologists) are:


Leadership: 65%

Communication: 64%

Collaboration: 55%

These are topics that are closely tied together: an effective communication is needed so that an active collaboration between people, teams and departments can happen. True leadership takes place when leaders can articulate (communicate) their vision and strategy, and involve others (collaboration) in accomplishing it.

These are all about building a connection, about building relationships. These skills can be trained, and are especially valuable in a working context. To train these skills the ideal is have a face to face format, and an active, practice-oriented methodology.

Examples of the most needed, crucial soft skills training is:

Leadership: Strategic thinking, Leading without formal authority, Leading through change.

Communication: Communicating with confidence, Influencing others, Giving & Receiving feedback

Collaboration: building relationships, effective listening, change management

There is currently a war on talent, with many companies actively recruiting staff from its competitors. Retention is a key issue for most organisations, and that is very much connected with the fast-pace changing world and workplace. Providing learning opportunities and soft skills to its staff becomes vital to companies. 94% of staff say they would stay longer in the company if the company invested more in their training and career development.

HR TRENDS AND INSIGHTS FOR 2019

Learning in the digital age: or getting digital

HR is getting hands on with tech, and some organisations are doing this better and are at more advanced stages than others – companies are in very different stages of digitalisation. Tech use is rising and will continue to influence the design and use of learning.

Most people check content (websites, email, training) on their phones, and it is now the preferred way to access content online.  Training will need to adapt to this reality and to become more and more digital.

During the HR Inspiration London there was quite a lot of discussion around how automation and digitalisation are changing the workplace, as well as on the perceived impact of this. Some participants mentioned people fear losing their jobs and be replaced by automated processes. One thing that everyone agreed was that automation has its limits. The benefits are that it frees time for other tasks that are more strategic and need human attention.

In overall, Tech is an enabler. It’s complimentary to human action but cannot replace it entirely. One example that was brought up referred to HR systems. HR systems can nowadays anticipate when a staff member is to leave a company, signal it to HR and recommend candidates for the replacement, candidates that are already on a succession list. Despite the fact that a technological system can predict a departure, its human action that can prevent it. Therefore, the future of HR includes both Tech and Human components, all equally important.

Some of the trends highlighted during the discussions will have a direct influence in learning and in how HR positions itself in organisations:

Learning strategy aligned with business strategy – training and development will be more and more connected with the organisational goals. Operations and HR will be working together and influencing each other mutually. Operations do not run without people, and people cannot achieve operational goals without an adequate training strategy.

Measuring training will become crucial and take place at a deeper level – As there will be a stronger connection with organisational objectives, companies will seek proof of applicability of learning. Decisions will be further based on expected return on investment, as well impact of training on strategic objectives.

Personalised learning experiences – Training is to become more individualised and personalised with the use of chatbots and AI (Machine learning). Learners will receive content based on their searches automatically (‘saw you were looking for this – just found you a new article on it’), with training content being updated much more frequently. With the advance of AI, training experiences will start including human-like conversations and engagements, as well as smarter on-screen interactions.

Constant challenges require constant flow of info/learning – HR will seek immediacy in answering to their learners needs. This will include using eLearning and micro-learning. Organisations who cannot keep up and offer this to their staff will fall behind. HR has a huge responsibility in this, in ensuring staff is equipped with the right skills at the right moment.

Advancing learning with technology – AR, VR and mixed reality are to start progressing within companies. They present huge benefits such as better retention, applicability and impact because they take place in an immersive environment and focus on learning experiences.

Traditional approaches to learning will (gradually) disappear – companies focus on thinking differently, on bringing innovation into play: it is only natural that this happens with traditional approaches as well. Companies will invest (even) more in blended learning, using gamification and real case scenarios. A one-size-fits-all training approach does not bring enough value compared to the innovation companies expect.

And well, this sums up our HR Inspiration London discussions and the insights that came from it. We are looking forward to more HR Inspirations editions and to meeting many more inspiring people!

 

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How about you?

What do you believe are the latest HR trends coming up?













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Chameleon, Company culture

Its Halloween season, and everywhere creepy decorations with ghosts and spiders have been making their appearance, both in homes and public spaces. Halloween has its origins in an ancient Celtic festival 2,000 years ago to mark the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with death.

Halloween seems therefore the right moment to shed some light on how company culture can be poisonous enough to scare away your most talented people, and when this leads to an organisational decline.

Your values, your culture

Culture refers to the work environment in your company, the setting and conditions you supply for your teams and staff members. Your company culture is made up of the values, beliefs, underlying assumptions, attitudes, and behaviours shared by your members of staff as a group.

You can observe a company’s culture through behaviour, noticing how people interact with each other, collaborate together, communicate and deal with conflict situations. These behaviours come from (usually unwritten and tacit) understanding and rules on how people work together within the company.

A company culture is highly influenced by founders and senior managers’ values and ideas, namely because they have high influence in shaping the strategic direction of the organisation and are the key decision makers.

Is your culture toxic?

There are telling signs that your culture is killing your company, but these go very often unnoticed. So, don’t wait until it’s too late.

How can you therefore recognise if your company culture is poisonous? Well, you need to consider 2 things: indicators and behaviours. If you have high staff turnover, increasing sickness rates, high absences from the office or cases of burnout these are indicators you can be in the presence of a toxic workplace. A lower engagement level is another pointer (if you don’t have a measurement for this conduct an engagement survey).

The other aspect to notice is behaviour: how people actually interact and behave on an everyday basis with their colleagues. Many times, an observation of your teams already reveals the dark sides of your company culture. An example? In a meeting the director presents a new compensations and benefits scheme linked only to personal results. Everyone remains silent, no comments or questions. But when leaving the room people start gossiping about the scheme, and how it will do more harm than good. If staff members are too afraid to speak up or to disagree with the founder or the senior managers, this is a sign of lack of psychological safety. And studies say the lack of psychological safety is one of the main reasons why people leave companies.

Culture killers

Culture isn’t a killer in itself, as it has no personality of its own. It’s the behaviour of staff members who display and continue the harmful corporate culture that causes problem. This is also the point of view of Dr. Sinoway, who, together with Harvard Business School Professor Howard Stevenson categorised employees that help an organization’s culture and those who hurt it.

            • Stars are the employees we all love — they perform to the highest standards, many times exceeding expectations, and act the right way (i.e. in a manner that is congruent and supports the desired company culture). These are the people we need to develop, care for and openly show appreciation to. 

            • High potentials are the team members whose behaviour we value — they do things the right way, and with whom you spot the potential to further develop within the company. Train, support and prepare these people and they will become your rising stars. 

  • Zombies are the living dead in your company – they just don’t show up as living to your organisational values, and their performance may be just slightly above ok. These are the people who, when problems arise, were ‘only doing their job’. Although they may not actively be doing anything to damage your culture, because they lack engagement they are also not bringing you any value.

Vampires are the real threat – they perform really well at a functional level (they get things done and produce results), yet they are completely misaligned with the desired value and behaviours. An example of this is someone who is great at acquiring new clients (produces excellent results) but who pushes his/her team to exhaustion in order to achieve it when one of the company values is teamwork.

However, because their functional performance is high they acquire power and influence, and can move up in the ranks. Over time, they acquire followers: the zombies who are also in dissonance with the company values and aspire to better performance.

Where culture comes in

As Dr. Sepah highlights : ‘your company culture is who you hire, fire, and promote’ and therefore you have a choice in promoting the culture you want to have internally. Most companies have good intentions but are sometimes naïve concerning the values and culture they wish to install. They identify aspirational values which they genuinely intend to respect. Nevertheless, these good intents get lost in everyday actions which become contradictory to the culture that you want to install. One example of this is the Libor scandal in which financial institutions were accused of fixing the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR). At least one of these financial institutions held integrity as a core value, yet this proclaimed value didn’t reflect their practiced values.

This is what Sepah calls a gap between aspirational and practiced values, and considers as an indicator of how much your company’s culture needs to improve. The actions you take to bridge the gap is predictive of whether it will.

If you don’t act on these internal conflicts to build the culture you want, you will get vampires and zombies attacking the stars, the high potentials and the team members who are doing the right thing. The actual company values, as opposed to the aspirational values, are shown by who gets rewarded, promoted, or let go. And talent sticks with companies that are congruent with its values.

If you want to start actively building the culture you want get in contact with us. We’ll help you upgrade your organisational culture, or define the organisational values you want to live up to.

Your staff will appreciate the improved culture and reward your company with improved performance, but also with lower staff turnover. We’ll give you a hand in building an awesome culture!!

#Halloween #organisationalculture #HR #organisationalvalues #talent

How is your company culture doing?

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Chameleon
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Lately, I started reading a new book that inspired me quite a bit: Le cerveau du Bonheur. One thing it reminded me of is that our brain tend to keep hold of the negative events that take place throughout our lives. These recollections are retained in our memory archives, in a similar way to a protection in case we face a comparable event.

This functions as an unconscious automatism, a way for our body to warn and alert us. If you repeat the same negative event or conditions 5 years later, you will notice that your body has created and triggers its own alarm system, warning you through small signals. And you quickly feel it as stress, distress or anxiety.

To change this mind predisposition, we need to switch our way of thinking, and change our way of perceiving everything in black and white. Basically, by reprogramming our brain! Said this way it may seem a little absurd, yet absolutely possible. When facing a negative situation or an event that triggers anxiety, we tend to only focus on its harmful side. However, in reality we should take a moment to withdrawal from the situation, a moment of reflection, to evaluate and analyse the situation formulate it into something with positive possibilities and results.

Allow me to explain myself based on the book. The author tells the story of a trip he completed. During his trip he climbed a mountain, and he explains to readers how he remembers feeling satisfaction, pleasure and calmness. Nevertheless, he explains that in the very moment of climbing his feelings were quite negative, as he remembered the atrocious pain in his feet, the burning heat during the ascent and the feeling of being extenuated.

This is the transformation that I am referring to, because the author has overturned all the negative atmosphere into a positive memory. Seize the moment to keep positive memories, and refrain from the tendency to remember mostly the negative side.

The advice is to do it slowly: start by focusing first on little moments, and then converting your negative memories into positives.

Do not hesitate to join our various events. One of the topics will be dedicated to How to reprogram the brain, and how to operate this transformation.

We would love to see you there!



Our events:

 

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Chameleon

Ever wondered if some habits and techniques could allow you to keep your budget on track and better capitalise on the investment you are making on people?

 

In this article we will share with you 3 habits you can adopt to capitalise on your staff training while keeping on a minimum budget.

 

This is the challenge we all have when working in training: how to make the most (impact) with the minimum budget? We all want the investments we make to be worthwhile for our company, and with limited budget for training and preparing staff to perform we have to make the right choices.

 

So how to capitalise on the training you offer your staff while keeping your budget in check? Here are 3 ways to do this.

But first things first, good news is you don’t have to compromise on the quality of your training because budget is limited. And I understand these is the case for many L&D departments.

And even if you are in an organisation which invests deeply in developing staff and with enough financial resources to ensure quality people development, you can still find ways to bring more benefits of learning onto your organisation.

The idea is, with simple to implement strategies, to optimise how you reach out better to staff for a better learning experience while keeping your budget in mind.


1. Reap the benefits of social learning

Social learning means basically learning from others, in a social context, either that being formally or informally. Because learning happens with and through other people, when being part of a community or team, it is important to use social learning within your organisation and reap its benefits.

The knowledge and experience your staff members have are precious resources, and extremely valuable for your organisation from a learning perspective. And they are free.
So you can build on these assets to strengthen your learning strategy and deliver an even better service for people development.

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To do this you need to create the space for sharing and collaboration with others, either that be through organisation events (such as a lunch and learn, or best practices round tables) or

remotely via collaborative tools (chats, forums, or corporate social networks). The Advance LMS, for example, has a social learning component to it, where learners can share and story tell, and work together on projects according to their interests or to the training/projects they are following.
By using social learning, you can also significantly increase the impact of learning, generate higher engagement from your people and improved organisational outcomes.

 

 2. Create quality learning experiences

More than planning training events for staff members, create quality learning experiences which are:

 

1) engaging and participatory so that knowledge and skills can be easily acquired and retained,

 

 

2) brain-friendly, i.e. based on the brain’s natural learning cycle to boost people capacity to learn, problem-solve and create, and

 

 

3) results-oriented to enhance application of learning to the workplace.

To do this plan learning activities that change mindsets and behaviours, not only aimed at acquiring knowledge. This requires a deeper level of learning and change and experienced facilitators).

Offer a variety of learning activities and opportunities that cater to a variety of learning styles and levels of proficiency. This should also include a variety in the delivery of learning options: face-to-face, online learning, virtual reality learning, lunch and learn events, etc.

As Einstein said: ‘Learning is an experience. Everything else is information.’ Therefore organise learning experiences that appeal to the learner, and are oriented towards practice.

3. Use blended and online learning

Depending on your work environment, the learning objectives and the type of skills to be developed face-to-face programmes can prove to be essential.  However, this is not the case for all types of training, and training needs.
Compliance training (such as sexual harassment policies, training on procedures or internal policies) or software/technical-building courses can especially be adapted to an online format. And because this kind of courses can easily be transferred onto an online format it allows staff to access content at the most convenient moment and to re-visit content over and over.
For soft skills training, especially training that aims for a behavioural change, the most adequate learning delivery method remains face-to-face training. And in terms of efficiency some authors state this is the delivery method that produces more behavioural change, and that produces changes with a more long-lasting effect in individuals. This is especially true when face-to-face training is targeted, experiential, built on real work issues and when it gives participants the chance to share knowledge and experience.

Mixing online and face-to-face delivery – blended learning – can therefore be the most cost-effective (and budget-friendly) solution.

Besides cost-effectiveness we can also reap other benefits from blended learning. It allows customisation and adaptation of the training as learning delivery can be designed to fit in with your organisation’s specific workplace, context and stages of development, globally diverse workforce and even to adapt to the individual learner needs, experience and behaviour. As you can select and fit in many diverse resources and content, the possibilities are very wide.

Therefore, when thinking of developing new learning options, the important question to ask is: what needs to be delivered in a face-to-face format, and what can be done via virtual classes. By choosing wisely which content and learning objectives you are promoting via each format you are boosting the learning experience and using your budget cleverly.

As systems, procedures and processes change, as well as the workplace itself, your staff will need to succeed and ensure a good performance in them. Well-thought and planned training programs can support these changes and your organisational goals to ensure your people are guided through the change journey. Naturally, training is a key component for a smooth transition, and we hope this gave you some ideas on how to maximise it without breaking the bank…

We hope you enjoyed this article on the key habits easy to capitalise on your staff training.  Now we want to hear from you: which habit from this article are you most excited to adopt? Which other habits or techniques do you use?

Let us know by leaving a quick comment.   

Happy learning!!

#Learning   #Budget   #training

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Chameleon, Elearning, Learning technology

Virtual reality (VR) has become a buzzword on its own, more and more present. But what do we know concretely about it? Nowadays, virtual reality is a trend pushing many people to be actively interested in it. Many consider it a revolutionary trend that will shape the world of tomorrow.  

In this article we will show you some possible applications of VR in learning, and you will see that there are many more applications than just for video games.

Video games were one of the initial uses of VR, and VR headset marketing was really geared towards a gaming environment in its infancy. And it’s true that when used in a gaming environment, VR lets you immerse yourself in a virtual world with some pretty awesome effects. It will allow you to live experiences that only you can imagine. VR started then to be used as a tool for small getaways and trip experiences, because VR allows you to travel to the four corners of the world, without jetlag and without leaving the comfort of your living room. Imagine that you are in Belgium, and 30 seconds later you can be in China and a minute later you visit the USA. What’s not to like about it?

And a more innovative use: in Learning and training

Another use, and much more innovative is to use VR to deliver training within companies. This use is probably the least known (for now) but one of the most effective ones because it allows staff and employees to learn while fully immersed in the subject of your training.

Indeed, the use of VR in a training context, called VR learning, can have several applications.

For onboarding (induction of new staff) – to welcome new elements in your team you need to prepare them well, especially during their first days/months. This includes training them on the different processes and procedures your organization uses, as well as providing them an overview of your corporate culture. This is part of the essential information package, skills and knowledge so your new employee can work fully as quickly as possible.

VR applied to onboarding allows each new employee to quickly acquire the codes and culture of your organization, and thus to slip into his new position as soon as possible.

For initial and continuous learning – because the development of new skills and abilities, as well as the updating of existing knowledge, are needed continuously to keep pace with new technological developments as well as new processes and procedures in each company.

VR learning can be used to train your staff on safety procedures, on the use of machinery or technology, and even to improve some soft skills such as communication and negotiation. VRlearn uses virtual reality as a technology for best practice and learning, a method that replicates real life experiences in a fully interactive way.

To develop your rising stars – in your organization there are talents that you want to develop but who still need a little more experience or practice in a field or another. The best way to make your rising stars progress is to prepare them well. Through VR learning and training, they can train with realistic scenarios that put them to the test, in complete safety, because in the event of an error, there are no consequences for your organization.

Imagine that you want to prepare someone to manage a substantial customer account of 1.2m euro. With VR training your staff can train with a similar account using scenarios in a fully realistic experience, having feedback in real time for each action, without actual real effects on the customer account. A great way to prepare for complex tasks and put all chances for success on your side.

Learning and training in VR can be used among different sectors including medical and paramedical, industrial, hospitality and many others (see other areas of application).

VR has already proven itself in many contexts, and is also doing so in the field of training. Some recent studies even show that VR training is a much more effective method than traditional training, because it allows learning through real situations, with many more concrete and practical elements. So, if you are in charge of developing your staff, you might consider to train your employees in total immersion.

Would you like to experience VR Learning?

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Chameleon, Elearning, Learning and development

Some experts estimate that only around 20% of training and training related investments lead to some form of organizational benefit. This issue is commonly referred to as the “problem of training transfer”.   Why is it that such a small proportion of what was learnt during a training ends up being used back in the workplace? Well, in many cases it may not be the training per se, but the surrounding of it, the context in which the application of learning is enabled or hampered.   So how can we improve the rate of learning transfer our organisations?   Below is a list of the different actions you can take at different levels and that you can consider adopting to increase training transfer.  

At organization level

Define where improvements are necessary in the organization (such as: increase in sales) and link this with a learning strategy, in collaboration with HR and training.

When considering the organisational changes needed differentiate between what can be achieved by training and learning and what cannot. Not everything can be solved by training.

Regularly communicate about the importance of continuous improvement and learning to individual and organizational success.

At department level (L&D and HR)

Consider individual, team and organizational learning needs when putting together the organizational learning strategy to ensure learning needs can be addressed. Do this in collaboration with senior managers and other departments.

Clearly identify the knowledge, skills and abilities a learning activity needs to develop in staff members.

Plan learning activities that change mindsets and behaviours, not only aimed at acquiring knowledge. This requires a deeper level of learning and change and experienced facilitators).

Offer a variety of learning activities and opportunities that cater to a variety of learning styles and levels of proficiency. This should also include a variety in de delivery of learning options: face-to-face, online learning, virtual reality learning, lunch and learn events, etc.

Plan learning activities over a period of time so individuals have the opportunity to 1) digest what they have learnt, 2) practice how to best apply it to their context, and 3) display them consistently in the team and organization.

Set indicators to measure the effectiveness of learning activities in terms of improved performance on the job. Link these to the organizational strategy.

Line management level

Liaise with HR and L&D to assess which learning activities are better suited for staff members on the basis of their needs.

Suggest and set time for staff to participate in learning activities, as well as to apply their learning in the workplace.

Discuss with your team members individually how they can apply the new knowledge and skills. Highlight development opportunities such as engaging in projects, participating in working groups, or becoming ‘ambassadors’ for the topic within the organisation.

with your team create individual goals and action plans that are time bound, and that include specific milestones for applying the knowledge, skills and mindset they need to acquire through learning activities.

Review individual progress on the goals and action plan set together. Do this frequently (for example every 2 months) and don’t wait for the end of year evaluation to point its nose to do it.

Praise and recognize individual and team development efforts and application of learning to the workplace. Highlight the contribution of this to the team and to the organization.

Verify the effectiveness of learning by checking for improvements in staff performance. Partner with HR and L&D for this.

Individual level (staff)

Reassure yourself that learning and development activities are a positive and valuable investment from the organisation towards yourself. So, do commit and engage to it fully.

Discuss with your manager what are your tasks and goals, and set an action plan with an associated timeline for completion. Include specific milestones for applying the knowledge and skills you acquired (process and success milestones).

Share your key learning highlights with your peers. This can be done in multiple ways, as a presentation or team meeting, a report, or a as a help out to someone who is less experienced than you.

Offered to mentor other colleagues who are looking to enhance their knowledge in a similar area.

  These were some examples of actions you can do internally to boost your learning transfer. There are many more you can do!

Get in contact, we’d love to help you have a better learning transfer rate in your organisation.   Don’t miss out on our next articles…      

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Chameleon, Elearning, Learning and development, Learning technology

The effectiveness of hands-on learning isn’t new, and many organisations throughout the world have been making the move towards more participative learning for their staff.

But what if we could challenge the world of learning even more? Shouldn’t we be striving for something that goes beyond participation and moving towards action? After all, Edison did not invent the lightbulb when trying to come up with a better candle…

With learning it’s a bit the same: most of us are improving it. So today I want to challenge you to revolutionise learning, starting with the notion of fully immersive learning, which for me corresponds to a different version of learning.

What is fully immersive?

By fully immersive learning I mean a learning environment, real or virtual, that is very close or similar to reality, with the same conditions and ‘look and feel’, where people work towards a goal, making decisions, taking actions and interacting with the context and experiencing the consequences of those actions.

Fully immersive means creating a setting that recreates an identical situation in which we need to perform to actively learn and practice skills, processes and actions through experimentation.

This keeps people highly engaged in practicing behaviours and using thought processes that we can easily transfer from a simulated environment to real situation.

Among many others, here are the 5 key reasons why you should consider fully immersive learning environments in your learning strategy:

1- It accelerates learning

Fully immersive learning combines the added value of ‘learning and by doing’ and repetitive learning which reinforces memory retention. It combines problem-solving and decision-making in practice and life-like scenarios.

2- Eliminates the gap between theory and practice

By creating fully immersive experiences focusing on the learning by doing your learning becomes practice-oriented and allows you to acquire a depth of experience and know-how you cannot get any other way.

3- Boosts engagement levels

The participant is immediately involved  in their problem solving activity, focusing solely on the task at hand and with no other distraction. All of the senses are being used for learning.

With fully immersive learning experiences are interactive (the participants need to engage with the system) and not passive (just listening or watching what is going on) they are fully engaged in learning.

4- Is as realistic as real life

Fully immersive learning uses real life scenarios which portray different tasks and challenges that a participant will need to complete in the workplace. By being as realistic as real life people can experiment freely, make mistakes and learn from them. And just like real life you need to make decisions, which will lead to consequences, and then learn and adjust from them.

5- Delivers exceptional return on investment

Because people learn from doing and practice, they learn faster and retain what they have learned longer and better in their memory, leading to a higher application of learning onto the workplace as the learning is directly linked to the practice, and hence a better performance. This means that in comparison to traditional learning, fully immersive learning is much more powerful in supporting long-lasting learning and application.

One good example of fully immersive learning is Virtual Reality Learning (check out VRLearn) which can create real life-like situations where we can experiment actions and processes safely.

If you want to explore the possibilities of fully immersive learning or Virtual Reality (VR) for your learning we’d love to hear from you.

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Chameleon

The whole world has been watching the Lisbon Web Summit last week as media have been massively covering the event.

Independently if you are working in the Tech industry or not, we have collected 4 insights from our participation at the Web Summit that you and your organisation should definitely know. Get inspired from these as they summarise some talks and discussions observed, and indications on future trends.

1- Interest in tech has skyrocketed

Interest in tech is not only high but at its highest so far. The proof? Over 60 000 attendants from around 170 countries, 1300 investors, 2600 journalists, 1200 speakers and 2250 exhibitor companies were present at the web summit last week. Tickets for the 3 days event were sold out ahead of its start, and many people were still probing the internet for any last-minute attendants cancelling their participation, and asking for tickets which could be reassigned.

Avast showed security threats handled every day, Slack was present as a platform to collaborate with people at distance and Google GDELT project tracks news data from all over the world to monitor what is happening. AI seems to be everywhere.

Tech is not (only) for techies and those in Tech related industries, Tech is everywhere. And if your company still hasn’t opened yet to the potential of technology, then it definitely should and soon (rather sooner than too late).

2- VR is up and coming

VR (virtual reality) was the topic of many talks, meetings, and at the core of the solutions presented by many start-ups present. So if you think VR was a done deal think again. VR Learn (VR for learning purposes) met and welcomed many enthusiasts among event attendees and company CEOs, and all those interested in changing the face of learning.

Other VR companies were also very present to introduce new developed solutions which interact with VR, so much more is still under way.

3- It starts with people

Tech is your best enabler to get to people. Full stop.

To remain in the market, companies need to keep themselves focused on the customer and on the value they bring to the customer. Tech is the crucial ally in creating a connection with people, in maintaining that connection and foreseeing future trends or changes. Hence you need to surround yourself with tech that provides you the relevant data to support your decisions.

#Tech

4- Innovation is not only a (buzz)word

Innovation was the word used in every meeting and in nearly every pitch. So we might easily say it’s a buzzword, but that would be fading its true meaning.

Innovation is not only technical, it’s a mindset. It’s the ability to consider how to make changes and evolve into everything that is done. And innovation is at the core and in the mindset of the companies participating.

Uber presented its plans for the future of ride-sharing and the least you can say is they are innovative. They were focused on innovation and invention in every detail of their plans, looking into alternatives for challenges encountered and still believing better solutions can be found for the ride-sharing new yet fast-growing industry.

#WebSummit

#TechIsEverywhere

#WeAllNeedTech

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Talent

Halloween is already tonight, so it seems the best moment to share some scary HR stories. Here are some horror stories I came across when working in HR or from HR colleagues. All of them involve HR and the workplace, and good and bad decisions that were made. But that is for you to assess, this is how they took place… These stories are real (which makes them extra scary), yet names have been changed for confidentiality. Make sure to share your own stories in the comments below.

Double trouble

Kate, in the logistics department, started complaining and gossiping about her newly appointed boss (Tom). She would be constantly challenging his every decision and opinion. Tom, the team manager would often lose his temper with her when confronted, which at one point happened nearly every day. Once it became very obvious, HR was asked to help out. The HR advisor of the headquarters mediated a meeting with both, only to realise the source of conflict actually came from a workplace romance between both that didn’t work out.

Mediation failed (yes, HR is still is not expected to be specialist in couple’s therapy…) because there were underlying issues which were unrelated to work.

This meant some changes had to be operated in-house. Kate was moved internally to work with another team and made to report to a different manager. Tom followed training on best practice management and learned how to address conflict in a team.

Team conflict

In a small team of only 2 people: the assistant (Bob) and the Director (Peter) could not stand each other. Peter was Bob’s line manager. Bob accused Peter of treating him unfairly and of making discriminatory jokes connected to his ethnicity.

These remarks were always made during one-to-one meetings so Bob decided to record one of the conversations. Bob took the recording to HR and to senior management as proof and asked to fill a complaint. The HR officer heard from colleagues that Bob was also making nasty comments about his supervisor around the office, using insults and questioning his intelligence.

Both were summoned by the HR director and a senior manager and called to order to respect the workplace values. Their behaviours improved, but the quality of their exchanges soon deteriorated again as it was difficult for both of them to hold challenging conversations. They were both asked to leave the company.

Not happy

Carol was a middle manager who had been with the organisation for over 10 years, having worked in different departments and in different locations. She considered herself to be ‘part of the furniture’ so when she was not selected to integrate a high level management programme she was not pleased with it.

She expressed her discontentment very openly, in person and by email, to her line manager, to colleagues, to heads of other departments, to the talent development manager, to HR, to other staff members and even the CEO. Although everyone considered the behaviours she displayed to show her discontentment unpleasant and unacceptable in a professional context, HR intervened to seek a resolution. She was assured a place in a forthcoming similar programme.

Troubled expectations

Alex’s boss was very open about his plans to ‘rise up’ as a senior director. His skills and performance were appreciated internally, but he was abusive and unsupportive towards his own team. He defined himself as an expert, not a manager.

When Alex’s work began to be praised by senior management and hints of a possible promotion circulated his boss suddenly became hostile. He started bullying Alex by criticising his work publicly, condemning his way of dressing too neatly and giving him uninteresting tasks for which he was overqualified.

Alex and other colleagues (who noticed the behaviour) asked HR to get involved. The two HR counsellors involved were clear a behavioural change was needed, and suggested different measures for that change to happen which included coaching, training and a closer performance management based on human interactions with the team. Alex’s boss refused the coaching and to participate in a training programme. After a 4 months tough mediation process the boss’ behaviour did not improve and after a few warnings he was laid-off.

Boozy colleague

There was a guy (Tim) who was known in the office for enjoying a few cold ones over lunch and then coming back to the office slightly drunk. Office colleagues would gossip in the corridors and halls about how difficult it was to hold meetings with him in the afternoon, and of his boozy breath that disgusted them.

No one dared to address the issue because – here it goes – he was the HR Director. He was even once escorted out of the facilities by the health and safety officer who considered he was far too wasted to work. Even so, he ended staying in the organisation for years.

How about you? What are your horror stories? Make sure to share your own in the comments below.

#Halloween
#Horror
#Hr

www.learningchameleon.com

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